23rd - 26th June 2011

“On this earth what makes life worth living”

Here we are almost 10 days since the cloture of the Tunis Exchange Forum; loads of cheerful emails from the participants are still filling our inboxes, a sign of the successful gathering.

Call me retarded, but frankly I am still digesting half the discussions and presentations I listened to, so much input not only from the upper side of the Mediterranean but also from Tunisia and it’s neighboring countries, so much good-will in here and like the famous Palestinian Poet and Author Mahmoud Darwish said once: “On this earth what makes life worth living”.

Tunisia, Egypt and Yemen today are described to be in a democratic transition, a description over used these days in the news and social gatherings. But when would we shift to total democracy?

Some says, look at the French revolution for example, it took some 200 years to have the France we know today (still not totally cool); or look at the United States still debating gay rights and their equal right to marriage (like if it’s OK for a majority to decide upon what rights minorities can have).

Democracy in Spain and Greece doesn’t seem working good enough; an Egyptian friend brought up in a discussion “Democracy: anther product of experiences you can’t afford”.

According to Wikipedia, Democracy is defined as a form of a government in which all citizens have an equal say in the decisions that affect their lives. Ideally, this includes equal (and more or less direct) participation in the proposal, development and passage of legislation into law. It can also encompass social, economic and cultural conditions that enable the free and equal practice of political self-determination.

Do we have such thing applied somewhere in the world? Probably in Scandinavian countries and Canada; a Greek friend gave a presentation on how e-government/open government can guarantee transparency and equal participation of the people in the decision making, but with that a whole infrastructure and social awareness should come along. (Too expensive? I think not, governments should press the brakes on weapons and arms manufacture). –complicated, I know.

Long story short, none of us is willing to wait another century to feel belonging to a democratic countries, where not only all citizens are able to decide upon what matters to them-themselves but most importantly to peacefully co-exist.

So much good will in the world, but still old narrow-minded and sick selfish power addict personas are holding key positions and our focus should resolve on treating those.

I’m walking around with more questions than answers, but I think you got the point. Anyhow, we should gather again, 3 days aren’t enough to solve everything world savers :-)

Tunisia, Egypt and Yemen

Tunisia, Egypt and Yemen today are described to be in a democratic transition, a description over used these days in the news and social gatherings. But when would we shift to total democracy?

I Like Your Post My friend

I Like Your Post My friend

Kudos! What a neat way of

Kudos! What a neat way of thininkg about it.